X Close
Your Cart
Keep Shopping
Ideas On Strategy In Jiu Jitsu

Ideas On Strategy In Jiu Jitsu

Exploring the Strategic Component of Setting up Submissions…

In Jiu Jitsu, learning technique is only one facet of the game.  Beyond technique, the strategy of how you set up a submission is paramount.  Just as in boxing, the mechanics of a hook or cross are relatively simple. However, punching technique is of little value if you do not have the strategy to get past your opponent’s guard.

In Jiu Jitsu, one way this is done is by baiting a submission.  Some grapplers offer an apparent escape from a dominant position like side control or back. Once the person tries to escape the position they find themselves funneled into a worse position like guillotine or honey hole respectively.

Another way is by forcing the mistake. One could leverage shoulder pressure or cross face from side control to force an arm up and begin a submission sequence. In a similar fashion, this can be done from knee on belly. Pain compliance is a strategy for creating opportunities that would not otherwise be there.

Learn strategy from John Danaher. Click Learn More!

LEARN MORE

 

John Danaher talks about the double trouble principle from setting up submissions. Danaher states, “Double Trouble: One of the founding principles of my leg lock system is that of double trouble. This is the idea that for any given leg locks attack; the overwhelming majority of my opponent’s defensive reaction will come from the OTHER leg. Knowing this, If I can constrain the other leg, MOST OF HIS DEFENSE WILL BE SHUT DOWN FROM THE START AND I CAN DOUBLE THE AMOUNT OF TROUBLE HE FACES IN ATTEMPTS AT ESCAPE. The clearest demonstrations of this principle in operation come from cross ashi garami situations where the second leg can be bound up to totally negate an opponent’s defensive options and create a quasi-pin that rivals even the best conventional pins for control over movement. When my students began using this approach, observers were amazed to see them totally controlling even very talented opponents for long periods of time before finishing. Note that double trouble is a principle - NOT A MOVE - thus it can be applied in many situations and in many different ways. Making it a core element of your leg game will greatly increase your control over struggling opponents and make for more high percentage finishes.”

Ultimately, learning technique is just one component of the game. As our Jiu Jitsu grows past the beginner level, an important component is how to set up the submission. What is your favorite way to set up submissions?

Learn leg locks from the master. Let John Danaher tighten up you leg lock game!

BUY NOW