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Hit The Russian Tie Throw With Ease

Hit The Russian Tie Throw With Ease

The Russian Tie Throw

The Russian tie throw is a powerful grappling technique that works really well in jiu jitsu, submission grappling and MMA. The Russian Tie itself is a versatile position that can end up in a variety of takedowns including ankle picks, front headlocks, cradles, and much more.

To pull off the Russian Tie Throw, you just need to roll under your opponent with your head in between their legs. It will take your opponent over your body and down at the other side. When done quick and explosively, this takedown is actually quite spectacular and finishes in Side control.

Check out this wrestling instructional video on how to hit the Russian Tie Throw, we're really a big fan of the setup of the grips.

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Here's another jiu jitsu instructional video showing how to get the russian tie throw using the gi.  It's done a bit differently than in the gi, but still very effective.

Here’s how you can pull it off:

Step 1

The first thing that needs to be done is tackling the grips. You need to ensure that your opponent has no kind of grip whatsoever on you. If they establish a collar grip, then break it. Next, establish a cross grip on their sleeve. This means that your right hand will grip the Gi near their right wrist. In this instance, your left hand will have to go over the shoulder and take a hold of the back of the Gi collar. Here, the grip is a thumb-in grip, with the other fingers at the outside of the collar.

Step 2

Since you’ll be standing right in front of your opponent, you might want to change your approach. Otherwise, you’ll end up rolling over, giving up side control in the process. What you need to add here is Kuzushi- a key principle in Judo. Translated from its original Japanese, Kuzushi means “off balancing”. To throw your opponent off balance, you will have to constitute a threat to both their base ad their posture.

When you’re on your feet, you can do this by attacking the posture with your grips and looking for foot sweeps that will make your opponent move in a certain way. Just push the opponent to the back, while you step forward. Then, stop suddenly and change your direction, making your opponent to follow suit. After a few steps, use an outer sweep to sweep their lead foot. If you don’t get it, then you have the Russian tie throw locked and loaded.

Step 3

With all the above steps, an experienced jiu jitsu fighter will most likely retract the leg that you’re trying to attack. However, this is what you want. You have the opponent standing in the same Orthodox stance as you. It opens up the space that you need to execute the Russian tie throw.

You will need to properly position yourself for the roll. If you miss it, you’ll most likely end up on the bottom. The goal is to kneel with your back leg first. Next- and most crucial- you have to place your head right in front of the foot off the opponent’s front leg. If you’re in another spot, the throw won’t be successful.

Also, as you position your head, don’t forget the grips. Tuck the elbow of the arm that grips the opponent’s sleeve close to your torso. With the collar grip, pull as soon as your head touches the ground before you opponent’s foot. Extend your legs and roll across your back. With this, you will be able to hit an armbar.

The only thing you need to remember is to hold on to both grips till you’re done.

The Russian Tie is one of the most versatile 2 on 1 grips which came from wrestling, but applies to all grappling arts.  Learn how it can improve your jiu jitsu / grappling game.

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Ready to add some wrestling concepts to your jiu jitsu game?  Then you gotta check out this DVD series by Hudson Tyler.  

Here is some of what you will learn:

  • Single wrist set up & control 
  • Single wrist stack 
  • Single wrist step over to half 
  • Reverse arm bar 
  • Tilt from single wrist 
  • Cradle off of single wrist
  • Knee slide drill
  • Knee slide to escape
  • Wrist reversal
  • Elevator sweep reversal
  • Granby to escape 
  • Granby to reversal 
  • Changeover/knee slide drill  
  • Changeover  
  • Escape when opponent attacks belly ankle 
  • Granby roll when opponent attacks belly ankle 
  • Defense when opponent throws leg in 
  • Defending the power half 
  • Defending banana split 
  • Sit out defense to legs 
  • Defending power half when opponent sits to butt 
  • Fefending when opponent grabs his own ankle 
  • Club replacement drill 
  • Half pull full drill 
  • Under hook shuck 
  • Hand fighting sequence from under hook 
  • Arm drag when opponent has an overtie 
  • Hand fighting sequence for 2 on 1 Russian
  • Inside tie/outside tie hand fighting
  • Running the pipe single leg 
  • Knee block to finish single leg takedown
  • Transition finish to single leg takedown
  • Twisting finish to single leg takedown
  • Same side single leg finish 
  • Finishing the single from knees  
  • Finishing the single when both guys are on knees  
  • Finishing the single when opponent Whizzers 
  • Defense for opponents collar tie  
  • Defending the opponents under hook 
  • Defending the 2 on 1 
  • Defending  the opponents inside tie 
  • Defending  opponents outside tie 
  • Defending the single when leg is in the middle 
  • Defending  the single leg by bringing the leg inside 
  • Defending  the single when both guys are on the feet  
  • Defending  the single when opponent is on knees 
  • Defending the single when both guys are on knees  
  • Far ankle bait 
  • Conventional defense when both guys are on knees  
  • Defending the low single takedown

"Hudson Taylor's wrestling for JiuJitsu is amazing. It's a game changer that will help a JiuJitsu player gain advantages standing and scrambling. He's a gem of a grappling coach that helps bridge the world of wrestling into the world of JiuJitsu."

-Phil Balmant – Black Belt/Instructor – Marcelo Garcia Academy

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