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Rodrigo Artilheiro Shows A Nasty Wrist Lock From Closed Guard

Rodrigo Artilheiro Shows A Nasty Wrist Lock From Closed Guard

Wrist Lock From Bottom Closed Guard by Rodrigo Artilheiro

Wrist locks do not get enough attention in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. Some BJJ players forget that wrist locks can be hit from virtually any position. The wrist lock, if properly applied, is one of the best submissions you can learn for gi, nogi, or self defense. Some people think wrist lock submissions are corny but they are super effective, so what not use them?  It allows you to use a massive amount of leverage against a small part of someone’s body. This makes the wrist lock is a good technique for smaller guys to learn for bigger opponents.

Travis Stevens is also a master of the wrist lock and considers it his secret weapon when he's training and competing. Click the learn more to discover the secrets to the wrist lock game.

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Today we are going to explore a wrist lock technique from bottom closed guard by a man named Rodrigo Artilheiro. Rodrigo is a black belt in Judo and a Brazilian National Champion in Judo. He is a world class wrestler and 7x National Wrestling Champion in Brazil. He is also a black belt in Jiu Jitsu, and 2x ADCC verteran. Rodrigo has coached some of the best Brazilian UFC fighters including Vitor Belfort, the Noguira Brothers, Werdum, and Crocop. He is also a Krav Maga instructor who has been to Israel three times to work with the best Krav Maga guys. Rodrigo is a master when it comes to defending yourself in a real world street fight scenario.

The bottom closed guard is often thought only as a defensive position, and not one you would think you could hit a wrist lock from. Rodrigo is here to prove all of that wrong. Watch the video below of Rodrigo Artilheiro demonstrating is wrist lock from bottom closed guard and then we will discuss the technique. Check it out now!

Often times, the top guard player is going to be looking to secure some type of wrist or gi sleeve control. The first thing Rodrigo likes to do when his training partner has a hold of his gi sleeve is to grab his wrist and then break his posture using his legs to bump him forward. From here Rodrigo swims his other arm underneath and over his training partner’s arm to secure his grip. This will trap your opponent’s arm and wrist. Once the grip is secured, Rodrigo switches his closed guard so that it is high up on his training partner’s back, controlling his arms and shoulders. Rodrigo traps the shoulders and then changes his grip to submit his opponent with the wrist lock.

Take note of where your opponent’s elbow should be. Rodrigo uses the side of his body like a wall to create the angle necessary to pressure the wrist. Even if your opponent has a flexible wrist, it will break with enough pressure. What I like the most about this technique is how Rodrigo traps the arm. It is very common to go over your opponent’s arm to trap it, but by coming underneath and wrapping around you set yourself up for the perfect wrist lock submission. I think some Brazilian jiu jitsu players consider wrist locks “cheesy” because they are often times so blatantly easy to get. All it took for Rodrigo to hit this wrist lock was good control with his hips and legs and a quick trapping of the arm.

Almost anyone should have an opportunity to hit this wrist lock at one point or another. Closed guard bottom is such a common position to find yourself in. It is also incredibly common for your opponent to use one of their hands to grip your wrist or gi sleeve. By having this handy submission in your Brazilian Jiu Jitsu tool kit, you become much more efficient with your movements. This is a seriously low effort, low risk submission that everyone should know. So be sure to give this one a try the next time you are on the mats. It could be the way to a quick victory in competition. Thank you Rodrigo Artilheiro for demonstrating this awesome wrist lock from bottom closed guard for us today!

Wrist locks are everywhere in jiu jitsu and all grappling arts. Attacking the wrist is a fairly simple principle that we see in many martial arts, not just "aikido". But the secret to the wrist lock is knowing where they show up in jiu jitsu - HINT it's EVERY WHERE, and how to set them up properly so they can't escape.

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