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The Hip Heist – Stop the Stalling and Start Making Moves

The Hip Heist – Stop the Stalling and Start Making Moves

Stalling is an unfortunate part of jiu jitsu that I’d venture to say a large percentage of practitioners do at some point during live training.  

As we all know, it can be exhausting training round after round giving each round one hundred percent of our effort and energy. We all also know the benefit of pushing it.  Pushing through the thoughts of stalling or slowing the pace and taking it easy for a round. Sometimes we may end up training with someone who likes to stall a little more than we’d prefer.  That’s ok, it takes two for stalling to work and we have the ability to refuse to allow that to happen.

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Taking a look at Professor Deblass’ Hip Heist Series he shows a few options to force your opponent to move, or ultimately give you a dominant position if they refuse to do so.  

From bottom half guard, with the butterfly hook in, frame with what would be considered the “top” hand or the opponent's’ shoulder.  This will allow you to do a partial technical stand up removing your bottom leg and moving your body to be almost perpendicular to your opponent.  At this point you should be kneeling on the knee of the leg that was originally the bottom leg, and flat footed on the foot that was your butterfly hook, with your body slightly in front of your partner and close to perpendicular.   At this point your opponent will only have two choices.

Option one, they can grab your leg.  If they choose this option, use the arm that was framing on their shoulder to stuff their head to the mat, drop to both knees rather than your kneeling position.  Next, reach across the body, reaching into their turtle and grabbing the wrist and ultimately getting a kimura grip on the opposite arm across the body.

Once you’ve secured the grip you want to sit straight back.  This should cause you to land with your opponents’ in a tee position to your body. Your opponent isn’t going to stay here and as they move, typically in attempt to turn into you it exposes their back and gives you an opportunity to use your grip to pull yourself into them and get your hooks and start working your back take and back control.

Option two is the opponent stands.  As they stand it creates space for you to enter into leg attacks, as shown in the video.  You could also use this as an opportunity to move to a different type of guard if you’d like.

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An additional quick option shown in the video is if the opponent stands as soon as you frame on their shoulder.  This allows you to simply shoot a single leg on your opponents’ front leg. As they stand it will leave their front leg in an ideal place for you to attack.

Remember that the idea here is to keep moving, it’s ok to stand and then sit back to the same position and then stand and try the technique again and repeat the process as many times as necessary to exhaust your opponent and ultimately execute the desired technique.

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