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Your NEW Single Leg with Andre Galvao

Your NEW Single Leg with Andre Galvao

 

We all know that wrestling lends itself readily to a BJJ setting, most particularly from the standpoint of takedowns. Traditionally, wrestlers that crossover to BJJ enjoy a little bit of a smaller learning curve as the idea of grappling is already instilled. Not all takedowns and wrestling concepts translate perfectly to BJJ but through some adaptation wrestlers can transition their skillset and become highly successful. 

It would be nice to start BJJ with a great wrestling pedigree already a part of your repertoire but this of course is not always the case. In many cases, most BJJ practitioners do not have any experience when it comes to the standing aspects of combat. This is where it can be incredibly helpful to begin learning some basic wrestling concepts. With some practice and some focused study, you can recruit some basic knowledge of wrestling in to your game and become much more effective from the feet. If you hope to compete in BJJ, this isn’t something that can be skipped. 

But which takedowns should you learn? There are some that lend themselves much better to BJJ than others and there are modifications that must be made so that we don’t get ourselves into trouble. It’s not mandatory that you delve in to the inner workings of every takedown in the wrestling playbook. Adding a simple double leg and a single leg to your arsenal, along with the ability to sprawl could be just what you need to help you round out your skillset and become a more complete fighter. 

Andre Galvao has released a new instructional on this exact topic entitled, Takedown Dominance. Its available now and with the content, he’s provided the perfect blueprint of takedown instruction made applicable for jiu-jitsu. If you’ve ever seen Galvao in action, you know that his game is relentless and his takedowns are on point. He’s modified the best takedowns in wrestling, molded them, stripped them of danger, and now, he’s bringing years of study and innovation to you in this comprehensive body of work dedicated to takedown proficiency. 

You don’t capture ADCC gold 6 times without the knowledge of what to do at the opening of a match. Galvao has been a major contender in any BJJ competition setting for years and with this series he’s baked in all of his knowledge of the dangers and treachery of takedowns, bringing you the most efficient guide yet to becoming more successful from the feet. 

Take a look at this piece of instruction on the single leg from Galvao. This is as simple as it is brilliant and its something you could literally add in to your game and use immediately. Pay special attention to the dangers that Galvao avoids by using good technique and to the finishing mechanics. Take a look! 

 

We’ve all been here. As Galvao describes the makings of the half-hearted single leg attempt, I can’t help but shake my head at myself. Takedowns require commitment. If you’re planning to attempt a shot at a takedown from a football field away with your head down, you might as well just lay on your stomach and have your back taken or give your partner your neck and call it a day. Let’s fix this right now.

Dominate with Galvao’s favorite takedowns! Click Learn More!

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Did you catch that? Galvao does not put his knees down when attempts takedowns. This is definitely a departure from tradition. Many takedowns will employ the connection of a knee to the mat to get the job done but in BJJ this puts us at risk. This is the first in a series of great modifications that Galvao is sharing here. 

Protecting his lead leg, Galvao simply looks to push his partner with his trailing leg hand. This creates a situation. As he pushes, his partner attempts to maintain his base, but there is also a transition of weight in to this partners back foot. This makes the front leg very light and vulnerable. 

As he performs his push, Galvao times this transition of weight and simply reaches down with his free hand and scoops up the leg. With his rear hand, Galvao connects to his opposite wrist on the underside of the leg, almost in the fashion of a seatbelt grip. He also keeps the leg pinched in between his things to maintain control over the limb. Galvao prefers this position to having the leg inside or outside of the legs because of its exceptional level of control when the conditions are slippery. 

IF your partner changes their stance, stay the course. You don’t need to change anything. The only difference will be the leg you pick up. This is a great way to keep things simple here. 

For the finish we see another departure from traditional wrestling. Galvao is careful here to avoid the dangers of “running the pipe” how you might see in wrestling. This puts our neck at risk and by the time we hit the floor your opponent may have already gained favorable position. Instead, Galvao remains in good posture, never bringing his body close to the leg. Here, Galvao begins to turn his body (not his feet) and faces the same direction as his partner and then use his bicep and shoulder put uncomfortable pressure on the knee. As this occurs, Galvao stays in this position and begins to turn in the opposite direction, lowering his level, and bringing his partner to the mat. Not only does he avoid the common dangers, Galvao also lands in favorable position to being advancing. 

Takedown Dominance by Andre Galvao

This is absolutely beautiful and incredibly simple. Add this and many more applicable concepts to your takedown game and become more proficient from the feet. Check out Takedown Dominance By Andre Galvao!

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