BJJ, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Gi, Grappling, Guard, Jiu Jitsu, Martial Arts, No Gi, Submission, Submission Grappling, Submission Wrestling, Submissions, Wrist Lock, Wrist Locks -

A Brutal & Easy Wrist Lock Submission

wristlock

Wrist locks have a bad rap in the Jiu Jitsu community. They are seen now, how leg locks were seen a few years ago. They are seen as cheap and dirty. Some even go as far to say that wrist locks do not take any skill to perform. But those people could not be more wrong. Wrist locks are advanced techniques. They make a Jiu Jitsu practitioner even more dangerous because he can then attack the small, easy to break joint while most people don’t see it as an option. One of my favorite ways of attacking the wrist lock is from the triangle choke position. Let’s see how we can use the wrist lock to win a fight.

Get the actual choke

The biggest mistake I often see when people want to wrist lock from the triangle choke is that they throw out a pretty lousy choke. They half ass it because they want to get the wrist lock. But you cannot do that. You must apply a strong choke so that the wrist lock will become a real possibility. It is also important to get the real choke, because if your wrist lock fails, you will at least still have a match ending choking technique.

Push the arm up & apply pressure down

For this, you actually don’t want the arm to be across the opponent’s body. That will finish the choke, but will make it difficult to finish the wrist lock. So instead while you maintain pressure with your legs, you can let his arm be straight in your triangle. When it is straight, his wrist will be exposed. From there, you need to get your hands working. Take both of your hands and cup the opponent’s hand right up on his knuckles. Too far down and the wrist lock will be ineffective. Now clamp your elbows in and apply pressure down on the knuckles. It will cause an extreme amount of pain and if he doesn’t tap, he will have a broken wrist.

I cannot stress to you how well this really works.  In the last tournament that I competed in, I used this wrist lock twice to win my gi division. Both times I was able to get the opponent in a triangle, but while he was worrying about the triangle, I was attacking the wrist. Wrist locks should be a part of everyone’s game and I hope they will be someday. They work for sport and for self defense. If you want to learn or expand your wrist lock game then check out…

Wrist Locks From Everywhere by Travis Stevens. Click here!


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