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How to Take Mount Using The Worm With Cesar Casamajo

How to Take Mount Using The Worm With Cesar Casamajo

Mounting Using The Worm by Cesar Casamajo

In the world of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu there are always fresh new faces rising to stardom. Cesar Casamajo is no exception to this. Cesar is a black belt from Brazil and he is only 25 years old. Cesar has a very bright future ahead of him as a competitor. Cesar is well known for his guard playing, and being an exceptional player from many different positions. Today Cesar is here at 5 time World Champion Bernardo Faria’s Academy in Bedford, MA to demonstrate one of his favorite techniques: how to mount an opponent using the worm. The mount position is one of the best positions to secure a difficult opponent. It is considered to be one of the most feared positions to get caught in, and your training partner will likely to go great lengths to prevent being caught in it. Because of this, many mount takes are unsuccessful due to overly aggressive tactics that will not work and are easy to counter. If you get too greedy and try to get to the mount position without first having proper control you are destined to lose your position and most likely end up in a very bad scramble to your disadvantage. Cesar Casamajo will show us how to correct this using the worm.

Cesar Casamajo is also the master of the butterfly guard with his own personal touch that makes your butterfly guard impossible to pass while you constantly attack.

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atch the video below of Cesar Casamajor demonstrating how he gets to mount using the worm and then we will break down his technique. Check it out now!

Cesar Casamajo starts off this technique as if he were playing butterfly guard and has swept his opponent using the traditional under hook and arm control. When you do this sweep you always want to first look to establish side control. There are some details from side control that Cesar Casamajo gives us to help get into the mount position. The first detail is to always grab underneath your training partner’s head to control the arm. This works in both gi and no gi and lets use your shoulder to pressure your opponent’s head and chin at all times. The second detail Cesar Casamajo gives us is that this technique is made effective by using your hips. You want to use your hips to trap your opponent’s hips by placing them side by side. From here you can get your arm across your training partner’s waist and use your elbow to trap him from the other side. Stretch your left leg to add additional pressure. This will prevent your opponent from recovering into half guard or escaping his hips. Now you want to look for the under hook as you grab palm to palm under your training partner’s shoulder. This will trap his arm very tight and render it very ineffective for countering. From here you want to establish your knee on belly. Pay attention to how Cesar Casamajo slides his knee on belly across the stomach of his training partner. He does not just lift it and place it down. This allows him to pressure down on his opponent the entire time he is moving into the position. This is a very slow and methodical approach that will work very well for you and add a high percentage of success to your game. Once you have established your knee on belly you can post with your leg to add further pressure. While you do this your shoulder should be pressuring into your training partner’s face. Pay attention to just how much pressure Cesar Casamjao uses to completely dominant his opponent and give him no realistic possibility of countering.

Once you have established this dominant position you can post your hand to the mat to start lifting your training partner’s arm. You want to generate the lift close to your opponent’s shoulder as opposed to his elbow. This is a minor detail but a crucial one for getting this technique right. Now simply walk little by little your opponent’s arm up and around his head. Remember, it is okay to be slow and methodical with this. You are in a relatively safe position having taken away both your opponent’s arms to defend and controlling his hips. If you do this too fast it will just make it easy for your opponent to reset his arm and you will waste a ton of energy for little to no gain. Finally, you want to drive the arm and hand towards your opponent’s head. From here you can trap the top of your training partner’s head with your arm, which will not allow him to move is arm back down. Bring your posting leg right up next to the ribs and slide your leg from knee on belly over so you end up in mount position.

As you can tell, the name of the game here is pressure. At no point does Cesar Casamajo let up on the pressure he is using to control his opponent. This allows him to be slow and methodical with his technique, removing all the space from his training partner, and taking away his ability to counter. So again, do not be greedy and move to quick when you are transitioning to mount. Establish your knee on belly, get your gable grip, and use your body to maneuvered the arm into the correct position before you finally slide over into full mount. Taking this approach will really save you a lot of waste energy on advancing, losing your position, and having to start all over.

Remember this one the next time you are playing side control. It could really help you, especially if you are a beginner and too eager when it comes to moving around your opponent. Practice this one slowly and methodically, just like how Cesar Casamajo demonstrates it. You want precise technique in order to make your movement more efficient. I think this is a great technique that even a complete beginner can start utilizing with very little practice.  So remember this one the next time you are in a live roll or in competition. It could be just the right adjustment you need to finally dominate your opponent and establish a strong mount position. And do not forget that once you get that mount there is a whole world of submissions and further transitions that you can hit!

Learn One Of The Most Dynamic And Innovative Guards in BJJ With This All New Instructional Set

Become A Master Of The Crafty, Old School Butterfly Guard With BJJ Black Belt Cesar Casamajo As He Shows Off His Unique Guard Game, From The Basics To The Advanced, To His Own Personal Innovations.

Cesar Casamajo is a black belt under Aldo Caveirinha, an instructor at Caveirinha Jiu-Jitsu in Hawaii, and an experienced competitor, with multiple IBJJF medals (including a Brazilian Nationals championship). Cesar brings an innovative perspective to his grappling, especially when fighting from his butterfly guard. While so many people are working with the same few standard grips and sweeps, Cesar has opened up the game with new entries and finishes to classic positions that he can use to surprise even the best.

This instructional set from Cesar is a full-service encyclopedia for the butterfly guard, bringing you from the most basic positional awareness, to how to sweep and attack in any situation, and then getting into how to pass and control from top against butterfly!

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