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Judo vs Brazilian Jiu Jitsu

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The age old style vs style debates. With the popularity of MMA, many of these debates have disappeared, except for one in particular. That debate happens to be which style is better, Judo or Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. Both are grappling arts known for their ability to control opponents completely. There are certain strengths that pertain to the arts that definitely can help someone choose which style they prefer.

During the standing phase of grappling, Judo is the superior art. While BJJ does have some effective takedowns, Judo is the superior art when the competitors are on the feet. Judo specializes their students into taking someone down at will, in a variety of ways, from simplistic to highly stylish. Fighting a good Judoka is a tough battle. In the blink of an eye, you can go from establishing a grip on the gi, to being tossed upside down. A good Judoka will set you up for a takedown so smoothly it is almost like they are not even trying. The vast amount of throws that Judo covers is simply incredible. And at times, all it takes is one big throw to end a match. Here is a great DVD set that shows the takedown strength of Judo.

Jimmy Pedro & Travis Stevens – The Takedown Blueprint – 3 DVD set

When the match hits the floor, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is the art that shines. Judo does have a variety of submissions, chokes and pins, but BJJ is the art that moves seamlessly on the ground. The art of BJJ prides itself on being able to beat anyone while on the ground. The strategies and techniques of BJJ simply out work a lot of the dated techniques of Judo on the ground. Much like a Judoka standing, a Jiu Jitsu practitioner a wide array of set ups for a multitude of attacks and finishes. Especially in modern day BJJ, the Jiu Jitsu game is so evolved, and Judo has yet to catch up.

When the gi’s come off, and the battle becomes no gi, the edge  once again goes to Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. While some Judo schools do engage in no gi sparring, it is very rare. Almost every BJJ school has regular no gi training.  A lot of the grips in BJJ can easily go from gi grips, to grips on an opponent’s limb, such as wrist grabs, ankle grabs and etc. Most of all Judo relies on gi grips. For example, the ADCC’s (no gi submission wrestling championships)  winners have all been BJJ black belt specialists, not Judo black belts.

Judo and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu are two arts on opposite sides of the coin. There is not an art that is better per say, but arts that complement each other very well. Both styles can take from one another, and practitioners of both can learn a lot from each other. Staying open minded is the way to become the ultimate grappler. Cross training is something that should be encouraged. That way, whether you practice either style, you can be successful in the other.


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