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BJJ SUBMISSIONS FROM MOUNT
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BJJ SUBMISSIONS FROM MOUNT

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Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is a highly energetic form of combat that uses extensive movement based controls, and a high calibre of submission attack. There are several different control positions in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, where an athlete can neutralise, and control their opponents.

What this article covers:

The mount is one of the most comprehensive control positions that an athlete can use against their opponent. Once the athlete has situated themselves into a dominant position in the mount, they are looking to trap an opponent's arms in an attempt to set them up for different styles of submission attacks.

Learn the complete FULL MOUNT game plan from one of the greatest grapplers ever, Andre Galvao and BJJFanatics.com!

jiu jitsu submissions from mount

From the mount position there are numerous ways to set up basic jiu jitsu submissions like arm bars, kimuras, arm cutters, arm triangles, and americanas.  There are also more advanced submission set ups that include all sorts of submission attempts like mounted triangles, mounted guillotines, the gogoplata, the monoplata, and even various leg locks like toe holds, and knee bars. The versatility of the mount position is extremely diverse, as athletes can not only use this as a definitive control position, it can also be used as an offensive platform to attack a high calibre of various submission maneuvers. 

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MOUNT POSITIONS

The mount position is one of the most iconic positions in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. There has always been a heavy debate between back control, and the mount, and which position is considered more effective. Some athletes believe that the mount is where the highest percentage submissions in bjj come from.  There are many different forms of the mount, as each style of positioning will help athletes to secure different types of submissions. A low mount is where an athlete sits on the waist of an opponent, as they drive their hips into the mats, and shoot their legs backwards, usually hooking into the legs of their opponent. This is called the grapevine position, and is usually used for keeping an active opponent stuck into the mats.

The higher mount is when an athlete shoots their knees up under the armpits of their opponent. This type of mount is used in an attacking formation so the athlete can manipulate their opponent's arms. Although this mount can be an extremely attacking position, it is however easier for the opponent to start their escape. When an athlete is sitting higher up on an opponent it becomes easier for them to bridge their hips, and use the momentum to force the athlete onto the mat. The reverse mount is a way that the athlete can start to attack their opponent's legs. This position is similar to a donkey guard, but only from the mount perspective. This position is not the most common Brazilian Jiu Jitsu position, but it can still be used effectively to search for toe hold submissions, or knee bar submissions.

The s-mount is an innovative way that an athlete can attack arm bars, monoplatas, or mounted triangles. This position requires an athlete to come up to a high mount, where they will shift one of their knees up underneath the shoulder of their opponent. as their other leg is situated with their foot forward, and their knee onto the mat. This position makes it extremely easy to be more attacking, which is what an athlete needs when they are securing the mount position. Another type of mount is called the technical mount, and this position is when an opponent manages to turn onto their side, whilst in the mount position. As the opponent turns onto their side the athlete will scoop their knee up tight behind their opponent's back, and step up onto their other foot, while bringing their heel extremely close to their opponent's sternum. This position is a great attacking platform into a kimura, or a gift wrap scenario. This position also becomes extremely easy to take an opponent's back, because of the exposure the opponent has given.

THE IMPORTANCE OF MAINTAINING THE MOUNT

During a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu match athletes will constantly be transitioning in and out of dominant control positions. Once they secure the mount position this is worth four points in a competitive match, but more importantly is a great place where they can attack submissions from. It is imperative that an athlete knows how to maintain pressure while they are in the mount, otherwise they will wind up losing position and being swept onto their back. The most common submissions in bjj are attacked from the mount like the arm bar, the kimura, the americana, the mounted triangle, the arm triangle, the cross collar choke, and the ezekiel choke.  This is why it is extremely important not to lose position whilst attacking submissions from the mount. This position can also be a great way to drain the energy of an opponent. All athletes need to have driving pressure into the mats, so they can take away any avenues of escape, or attack from their opponents.

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SUBMISSIONS FROM THE MOUNT

One of the most dangerous bjj submission maneuvers from the mount is the dreaded arm triangle. This submission maneuver can be asphyxiating for an opponent, as the tightness of this choke can be extreme. Setting this submission up from the mount can be rather easy, as all the athlete needs to do is begin by pushing one of their arms high up next to their head. Once the athlete can push the elbow up, they will begin to manipulate the elbow across the body, as their other arm wraps around the neck of the opponent. The athlete will then use their head to trap the back of the tricep, as they connect their hands together, preferably in an s-grip, but a gable grip will also suffice. Once the athlete has this position locked in they will jump out of the mount position into a side control position, as they lower their body down toward the mat, and use the squeezing power generated from their shoulder, and their arms to submit their opponent.

Another high quality submission from the mount is the mounted triangle, and this submission can be extremely daunting for an opponent. The amount of pressure that can be applied into an opponent's neck from the mounted triangle is extreme, and the athlete always has the option of rolling their opponent over into a traditional style of triangle from the guard. One of the best mounted triangle set ups is for the athlete to shuffle up into an s-mount position. As their knee shuffles behind the shoulder of their opponent, the athlete will look to bait the opponent with an arm bar attempt. As the athlete hooks the arm for the arm bar, they will use their other hand to control the other wrist of their opponent. From here the athlete will shoot their leg over the shoulder, and hooking around the neck into a triangle position. There are two different ways to finish this choke with the first just simply applying pressure into the opponent’s tricep. This will create an incredible amount of force into the neck of the opponent. The second way to finish this choke is to actually lock their foot inside the knee of their other leg, creating a traditional triangle from on top, as they use the squeezing power of their legs, and then pulling the head up into the choke to get the finish.

There is a sneaky darce choke that can be achieved from the  mount position. This involves some creativity, and some athleticism from an athlete, as they look to bait, and trick their opponent. In order to achieve the darce choke the athlete will need to set up a mounted triangle position. The only difference with this setup is that the athlete must use a really loose attempt, so that the opponent thinks they can turn onto their side facing towards the athlete. As the athlete begins to shoot their leg up over the shoulder, they will instead bring their foot in front of the face, giving their opponent room to escape the position. As the opponent gets up onto their side there will usually be a gap in between the opponent's elbow, and their armpit. During the transition the athlete will slot their arm underneath the armpit, burrowing out the other side of the neck, and into a darce choke position. They will then secure their other arm over the top of the head, catching their own bicep and using their chest to trap the back of their opponent's tricep. From here they can add their full squeeze and finish their opponent in a sneaky darce choke attempt.

Gi chokes are an excellent way to submit an opponent, and this is because the lapels act like a rope around the neck of an opponent. The cross collar choke is one of the most traditional Gi chokes, and is secured by using a cross grip with four fingers inside of the lapel. The other hand will cross over, and grab a grip on either the collar, or the shoulder, as both elbows are pushed towards the mat in a scissoring choke motion. The ezekiel choke is another valuable tool in the belt of a practitioner, the only problem with this choke is that due to the lack of posting off the mat, it allows the opponent to utilise a sweep. This choke involves wrapping one arm around the back of the neck, as the second hand takes a grip on the sleeve, and threads in front of the opponent's neck. Once this position is secured both wrists are pushed forward into a scissoring motion to create the choke.

Achieving arm locks from the mount is one of the more reputable ways to secure submission victories. Setting up arm bars is always highly recommended, but there is always a danger in giving up a position. In most cases when an athlete attempts an arm bar they have to take a seated position on the mat to finish the submission. This can prove costly, as an opponent that has a good arm bar escape may end up reversing the position. Kimuras, and americanas are also highly effective submission moves from the mount, and both of these bent arm locks can cause a significant amount of trouble to the shoulder of an opponent. Another good arm lock from the mount is an arm cutter, and this is basically a sneaky variation of an arm bar, except the athlete does not have to give up the position to achieve the submission. 

Some of the more modern day submissions from the mount can be well thought out. One popular submission is the guillotine choke, and this can be utilised from the mount position. In fact the guillotine is probably more deadly from the mount position, due to how the head is reefed in the upward direction. This choke is similar to a can opener, as the athlete will scoop around the back of the neck using the forearm underneath the throat. From here the athlete has two options. The first is to connect their hands together, and go for the traditional style of guillotine choke, but having two hands committed from the mount position can leave the athlete vulnerable to a sweep. The second option is to keep the one arm grip around the neck, while using the other hand to stabilise off of the mat, as they lift the neck upwards forcing quite a severe choke hold.

Another extremely modern submission from the mount is the monoplata submission. This arm lock is similar to the mechanics of an omoplata, but just from the top position. This submission can be achieved when an opponent has both of their arms wrapped around an athlete's body. This is an extremely familiar position in Mixed Martial Arts, as commonly an opponent does not want to get punched in the face, so they use both of their hands as a body lock when they are being mounted.  From here the athlete will move their base from out of the centre line, and over to a forty five degrees position, by stepping up onto one of their legs. Now the athlete can weave their hand underneath their leg that has stepped up, and grab hold of the opponent’s shoulder, at the same time as pushing their head down with their opposite hand. The athlete can now shift their base by moving their grounded knee over, which will enable the athlete to slide their leg over their face. To finish this submission the athlete will slide their butt up the back of the opponent, and towards the side, as they push their own knee inwards, creating the torque on the shoulder lock.

THE MODERN DAY ATTACKING MOUNT

The days of old have seen an extremely defensive mindset with the mount position. The mount was used as a way to neutralise an opponent, and suck all of the energy out of their movement. Of course there were submissions that have been utilised from the mount, but the defensive mindset of athletes have used the mount as a stalling tactic. In Brazilian Jiu Jitsu competitions, the mount is worth four points, and once an athlete has secured these points they don't have to advance their position. All the athlete has to do is wait until the time limit has finished, so they can win the match. The modern form of grappling has seen innovation after innovation with how the mount is utilised. The attacking presence of the mount position has given way to a multitude of new aged creative submissions. Moves like the monoplata, the mounted gogoplata, the triangle, and the one handed guillotine choke have all become extremely popular in today's grappling format.

Learn the complete FULL MOUNT game plan from one of the greatest grapplers ever, Andre Galvao and BJJFanatics.com!

BJJ submissions from mount

The mount position is also a good platform to launch into the leg entanglement game. Athletes have been known to use the mount as a way to frustrate, and stifle an opponent for long enough so that they can attack leg locks. This may seem out of the box, and also feels like it is not a mount attack at all, but because the setup has started from the mount position, then these submissions can be included as a high percentage mount attack. An athlete can switch into the reverse mount, which will open up an opportunity to use transitions like twister rolls into the truck position, where they can utilise heel hooks, calf slicers, ankle locks, knee bars, and the bjj banana split. These types of leg locks are highly functional, and extremely popular in the modern form of grappling. 

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