Cross Collar Choke from Failed Clock Choke with Gabriel Arges

Cross Collar Choke from Failed Clock Choke with Gabriel Arges

We spend a lot of time working techniques in the laboratory that is the training mats at our academies against training partners who are essentially allowing us to work out technique.  Very rarely does the execution of a specific technique or submission look exactly like what your Instructor or Coaches has shown the class.  

Most times, as the unwilling partner during live training, or the opponent during a competition recognizes the submission we're going for and begin to counter or work a potential escape.  In some cases, we are able to still catch the originally planned submission in the scramble or transition space as they work their escape, but often times, we are left holding an empty bag with no tap.

It's important to begin chaining techniques together, so that in the event of an escape or scramble, you are able to follow through and still succeed in securing the submission of your opponent.  Working to develop plans B, C, and so on is the sign of a maturing BJJ practitioner, who is able to adapt to the reaction and opportunities presented to them by the opponent.

In the video below, one of the most highly decorated black belt competitors on the scene today, Gabriel Arges demonstrates a collar choke that happens after a failed clock choke attempt.

Though an excellent choke to attack a turtled opponent, the clock choke does present problems during a scramble because both of your hands are typically committed to finishing the choke and holding onto the lapels.  Therefore, during a scramble, you may be unable or extremely slow to base, putting you in a bad spot.

Gabriel solves by essentially following the roll of the opponent and sliding his bottom leg upwards alongside of their back, so that he can lean to the far hip and and secure the bottom hook with his leg, stopping their roll and preventing them from scrambling anymore.  All the while, the original collar grips have been maintained and are able to choke the opponent in most cases, but if you do need to adjust you will have that time to do it at your leisure due to the hook trapping them in this sneaky back take.

So ask yourself, what your Plan B is for each of your favorite submissions.  Start thinking about the most common options that the opponent may have and begin developing ways to maybe not stop them, but to take them where they want to go, while still submitting them in the process.

And also, check out Gabriel Arges' new 3 volume BJJ instructional "Back Takes for Everyone" where he will show you all of his secrets to securing back takes from every possible position as well as submissions once you achieve the back take.  It's essentially two instructionals in one and available here at BJJ Fanatics!