BJJ, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Foot Locks, Grappling, IBJJF Legal Foot Locks, Jiu Jitsu, Leg Attacks, Leg Locks, Reaping -

Foot Locks Without Reaping

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If you compete a lot in Jiu Jitsu, you are familiar with the rules of the majority of tournaments, give or take a few specific rules for that particular tournament. But almost across the board, the majority of tournaments do not allow leg reaping. It’s a debated issue, but due to the IBJJF being the biggest body of tournaments, everyone follows this rule. This can make it feel difficult for people that enjoy foot lock attacks. But, there are ways to adapt to the rule, without having to use the reap. Here are three great ways of submitting someone with an ankle lock, without knee reaping.

Foot Lock From Ashi Garami

This is the first way that most people will learn the foot lock. It is a classic. Going into the position, known as ashi garami or single leg x. You will be able to initiate on the ground against a seated opponent, or use the position on a standing opponent to sweep him over. It is a strong position that even black belts use. When you go to ashi, you can get your standard grip, and finish the ankle lock with a good bite on the opponent’s achilles with your wrist bone. Starting with ashi is the best option. After you get the position and the finish down, you can play around with other ways of getting the foot lock.

Far Arm Assisted Foot Lock From 50/50

This particular version of finishing the straight foot lock has been made popular by Luis Panza, and works for different reasons. But from 50/50, it works especially well. In 50/50, the opponent will have one of his legs protecting and covering his other, making the traditional grip useless for the straight foot lock. Instead, use the far arm assisted foot lock. Using the rear naked choke style grip, you will have a powerful control and be able to easily get the finish with little work.

Foot Lock While Grabbing Your Own Lapel

This interesting version of finishing the foot lock is shown by world champion black belt, Yuri Simoes. With this version, you get a similar grip to the traditional, but instead of finishing with it, you actually grab your own gi. You grab your lapel up by your collar. With your free arm you post your arm for leverage and twist your body. This cool take on the foot lock will surely cause a lot of pressure and will allow you to get the tap from your opponent.

It is important to know how to finish foot locks without worrying about doing so without the reap. Especially if you are competing in gi, reaping is seldom allowed in tournaments, so you have to adapt to those rules. Learning this IBJJF safe foot locks should make their way into your game if you are competing. If you want to beef up your knowledge on these foot locks, check out IBJJF Legal Foot Locks by Jose Varella. It is a great insight for IBJJF rule tourneys.

IBJJF Legal Foot Locks, by Jose Varella, only $39! Click here.


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