X Close
Your Cart
Keep Shopping
BJJ Instructional Videos
John Danaher Leglocks
John Danaher Back Attacks BJJ
Down
Half Guard BJJ Instructional Video
The Arm Drag For Every Jiu Jitsu Fighter
articles/faria_arm_drag.png

The Arm Drag For Every Jiu Jitsu Fighter

,

An Arm Drag For Every Man And Woman

In Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, the arm drag is a simple technique that opens up a lot of options for back takes, submissions, and even take downs. Many would consider it a fundamental principle of grappling, and its use has been made effective by every top level competitor in the world at one point or another. So it is safe to say that you will study it thoroughly throughout your entire jiu jitsu career. There are many uses for the arm drag whether standing or on the ground, and it works because of your ability to pull your opponent in one direction while launching yourself in the other. The simplicity of the arm drag is what makes it work so well no matter what your size and strength are. Because of this we have many examples to look at.

One of Marcelo Garcia’s main BJJ practitioners is Bernardo Faria. Faria is known for dominating in the gi, but there is no doubt that he is quite impressive with no gi too. There are many reasons to use the arm drag as a tool for no gi competition. Let’s first check out what he has to say about his methods of using the arm drag in no gi. Check out the video below.

Using an arm drag effectively in take downs

When you are fighting an opponent on your feet the arm drag is a versatile tool for setting up take downs and trips. For example, double leg take downs can be very effective when set up with an arm drag. The reason for this being that is moves an opponent’s arm across their body, virtually giving you access to an entire side of their body undefended. It also sets you up to easily take the back, or change levels and shoot. Let’s take a look at how master of the drag Marcelo Garcia sets up a double leg take down using an arm drag.

As shown in this video, it only takes securing one wrist to get both hands on one of your opponent’s arms to go for the drag. If your opponent is giving you his arm, drag it across his body to clear an opening, change levels, and shoot for the double (or single) leg! Notice where Garcia places his other hand, directly above the elbow on his opponent’s arm, that’s an important detail. If you are in a battle for your opponent’s arm getting both hands on 1 wrist and pulling him down will break his posture and make it much easier to get the arm drag. Your training partner is instinctively going to try and pull his arm back, giving you a prime opportunity to shoot for the take down. As you can tell, Garcia has amazing speed, and so should you! Do not wait for the perfect an opportunity to shoot once the arm is cleared.

Using an arm drag effectively on the ground

The arm drag is as effective on the ground as it is standing. In fact, it may even become more useful. It can set up great angles for you and put you in dominant positions for submitting your opponent.

LEARN MORE

Let us have a look at Keenan Cornelius and how he used an arm drag to set up a darce choke. Check out the video below.

Darce choke is not a choke you would often think of trying to get from bottom because it little harder to do than it is from top. By arm dragging his opponent directly above the elbow, Keenan is able to pull his opponent forward, causing him to base with the arm that was dragged. Now Keenan has direct access to his opponent’s neck, where it is now feasible to go under the arm pit and secure the darce.

The arm drag is one of the best setups to get submissions, sweeps and chain into other series. Bernardo Faria uses the arm drag both in gi and no gi... and especially from half guard. His DVD series the No Gi Half Guard is perfect for those who love arm drags and the combination of fighting from half guard.

BUY NOW

Half Domination by Tom DeBlass DVD Cover
Catch Wrestling Formula by Neil Melanson
Butterfly Guard Re-Discovered Adam Wardzinski DVD Wrap
Judo Academy Jimmy Pedro Travis Stevens