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TRAINING FOR BJJ COMPETITION
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TRAINING FOR BJJ COMPETITION

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Brazilian Jiu Jitsu has fast become one of the most addictive forms of combat known to the modern Martial Artist. The technical application of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is similar to dancing, with its specific movements that are combined with perfect timing, and execution, making the art graceful and seamless to watch. The UFC became the major platform that BJJ needed to propel itself into the competitive world of Martial Arts. With the growth of the sport over the last few years, there has been a spike in memberships across the globe, especially in the US. As the popularity increased throughout America, many prestigious BJJ tournaments began to arise like the IBJJF worlds, the ADCC Championship, and other smaller events like Who's Number One and Submission Underground. 

 What This Article Covers:

A lot of time goes into the training regime of a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu fighter, as they will need to train BJJ 3 times a week as a minimum, this will help athletes prepare both physically and mentally for amateur and professional competition. Competing in tournaments can be a great way to test a practitioner's skill set, as the intensity of a BJJ competition can be ferocious. Jiu Jitsu athletes are among some of the most hardcore combat sports fighters in the world, as their long hours on the mats have turned BJJ into its own unique lifestyle. Training for Brazilian Jiu Jitsu competitions has its own set of regimes, which includes strength and conditioning, mental preparation, cutting weight, tactical gameplan proficiency, and hours of practise.

Giancarlo Bodoni is one of the most exciting grapplers on the circuit today!  He's joined forces with BJJFanatics.com to share his latest closed guard series.  Check it out here at this link!

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HOW LONG SHOULD A STUDENT PREPARE FOR A COMPETITION 

Preparing for BJJ competitions can go from a little as short notice, all the way up to a 12-week camp. Determining how long a preparation should be for a student is really up to each individual, and how they deal with their own fitness and proficiency in the sport. Higher-level athletes can be ready to go at the drop of a hat, whereas lower belts will need several weeks to prepare themselves mentally. It is extremely important to put a significant amount of time into these kinds of preparations, as the last thing a student needs or wants is to suffer injuries at the hands of sloppy technique. The average student will spend at least 4 weeks training extensively for BJJ competitions, this includes developing their game plan, practicing sweeps and guard passes, refining their submissions, and perfecting their escape maneuvers. This is why it is extremely important to spend hours upon hours on the training mats, so students can master every aspect of the game.

SHOULD STUDENTS COMPETE IN CONSECUTIVE COMPETITIONS

Sometimes students will compete in back-to-back tournaments, meaning a week after they compete, they will compete again. Although in some cases this is probably okay, for most people, there are some problems they will encounter. Students that can step up and win multiple divisions at competitions are fine to back up the following week in a secondary competition. Students that get eliminated from a tournament, or perhaps lose a few matches, are where they should take at least a few weeks and go back to the gym. This is important for beginners so they can work on the things that lost them in the fight. Students that hop from one comp to the next, will quite often forget about the lessons they needed to learn from any of their competition losses. Getting back to training is vital during the competition process, as this is how a student can iron out any kinks, or work on any maneuvers they need to progress in the art of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.

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HOW TO PREPARE FOR A COMPETITION 

There are many different ways to prepare for Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu competitions. At the end of the day, it's up to each individual to go through their own processes. Some things that never change are the basics, so when a student signs up for a competition, especially if it's their first time competing, it can be an overwhelming experience. Students must make sure that they are in the gym as much as possible training in Brazilian jiu-jitsu exercises when they are in the lead-up to their competition. This is the only way they will maximise their chances of winning the gold medal. Technical proficiency is one of the vital keys to becoming good at Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, which means students will need to execute game plans they have worked out during their training hours. It's quite common for students to come up with a game plan on the fly, as they are instinctively showcasing their Martial Arts skills. The problem is not everything goes to plan when competing in competitions, as opposition can be unpredictable and impose different challenges that a student never thought they would need to tackle. Going into a competition with multiple strategies is an extremely important aspect of any Martial Arts competition preparation. It is also extremely important to practise positional, and submission escapes so the student can execute techniques that will help them to gain a tactical advantage.

Mental preparation is a common oversight in amateur, and professional sports, especially when it comes to combat sports. Preparing mentally for a competition can take a critical toll on athletes, during their training camps. This is extremely apparent when watching Mixed Martial Artists prepare for fights in the cage, as training can be extremely time-consuming, and draining. Some people get nervous leading into competitions, especially when they know they have to fight competitors that have higher seniority. Understanding how to prepare mentally, and how to tap into that constant bravery, is something that gets easier over time. A competitor is never out of the fight, as a fight can turn extremely quickly, and it is usually a competitor's psyche that ultimately defeats them. This is where mental preparation comes into full effect, as students will find themselves in the deep end against an exceptional opponent, they need to dig deep, and tap into that mental fortitude they will acquire along their journey.

Cutting weight is another important aspect of competing in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu tournaments. Some athletes don't like to cut weight, as they would rather fight comfortably at their own weight class. For most people, cutting weight has become a science, as most athletes will try to cut down to the weight class below. This is a common practise as it gives the competitor the best advantage possible within the fight. Cutting weight can be dangerous if a student doesn't do it the right way, as people of different sizes, and different body fat percentages can only cut certain amounts of weight in a safe manner. Although it does seem dangerous, if it is done correctly then there's no harm to it, as competitors will look to head into their matches at a healthy, and acceptable weight.

Strength and conditioning is an extremely vital aspect for an athlete, especially competing in combat sports like BJJ. When a student begins training in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, many of the warm-up drills have a high percentage of core strengthening, joint strengthening, and various other muscle-building properties. This is why it is extremely important not to dodge the warm up, and embrace all of the movements in BJJ. Many students were asked to add extra strength and jiu jitsu conditioning to their training regime, like intense weight lifting workouts to increase power and strength. When it comes to getting strong for Jiu Jitsu, practitioners don't need to be powerlifting for BJJ, as it's not about lifting the heaviest weight, instead it's about the most functional movements that a student will use during a BJJ competition. These days there are many different programs that students can find online, as many high-level health professionals have developed intricate systems for preparing the body for rigorous BJJ competitions.

THE RIGHT WAY TO TRAIN FOR COMPETITION 

There is no real right or wrong way to train, ahead for a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu competition. Every practitioner has their own unique way of training and progressing through the art of Jiu Jitsu. Some students will only roll with higher-level belts in preparation for a BJJ competition, as this will get the best out of their training. There are two sides to this, as sometimes only training with higher level practitioners means most of your training will be about defense, and escapes, which is still a great aspect. Students do need to create highly proficient pathways for controlling and submitting their opponents. Sometimes it can be a good idea to train with lower belts, as this is an excellent way to practise techniques in a real situation. Some high-level world champions only roll with smaller, and lighter training partners, whereas others will jump into the deep end with just about anyone. Either way students train, they need to do what's right for them and maximise their chance at progressing through their own development.

CAN ANYONE COMPETE IN BJJ

Competing in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu tournaments is something that can be done by anyone. It is familiar watching the white belts showing fear of entering the competition arena, which is completely understandable due to the nature of the Sport. Students are encouraged by their instructors to compete in tournaments, as the competition arena is a great way to battle-test and showcase a student's Jiu Jitsu skills. Most seasoned competitors will compete regularly in BJJ tournaments, not only to inspire other members of their academy but for their own personal growth. Competing in a BJJ tournament for a white belt can be the perfect way for them to be inducted into the sport of BJJ. It's like the old saying goes if you want to learn how to swim then simply jump in the deep end. This is the same when it comes to competing at a Jiu Jitsu tournament, as it can seem scary from the outset, but once a student takes the leap they will be better off for it.

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FIRST BJJ COMPETITION

A first Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (BJJ) competition can feel like a whirlwind of adrenaline, uncertainty, and excitement. It's a thrilling stage where theory and practice meet in a challenging environment, where the pace is unpredictable, and every move can make or break the match. This competitive debut is a pivotal moment for any Jiu Jitsu student and serves as a testament to their hard-earned skills, commitment to the art, and their mental fortitude. Remember, stepping onto the mat is a victory in itself; it's proof of your courage and your willingness to test your limits against those of an opponent.

BJJ FIRST COMPETITION TIPS

Entering your first BJJ competition can be intimidating, but a few key tips can help ease your nerves and enhance your performance. Start by focusing on your conditioning and improving your endurance as competitions can be physically demanding. Implementing a strategic game plan is crucial - play to your strengths and make sure to drill your best techniques and escape maneuvers. Keep a positive mindset, remember to breathe, and maintain a strong mental focus throughout the competition. Lastly, hydrate well, get ample rest before the big day, and don’t forget to enjoy the experience - it's a major milestone in your BJJ journey.

FIGHT CAMP COMPETITORS

Fight Camp Competitors are the warriors who undergo intensive training periods to prepare for an upcoming BJJ tournament. These athletes follow a strict regime that includes rigorous technical training, strength and conditioning exercises, tactical game plan proficiency, and mental preparation. Fight Camp Competitors often train with higher belts and other experienced fighters to hone their skills and increase their preparedness for the challenges that lie ahead in the tournament. Remember, being a Fight Camp Competitor demands dedication, resilience, and a relentless pursuit of perfection.

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PROFESSIONAL COMPETITION 

There are a large number of highly prestigious tournaments these days, as many high-level athletes are competing in. With the international rise of the IBJJF World's, and No Gi tournaments like the ADCC, Who's Number One, and Fight 2 Win, have begun to produce an extremely high quality of grappling on the internationally televised stage. Fans across the world are now tuning in to Flowgrappling, and UFC Fight Pass to watch all their favourite grapplers. High-level athletes like Andre Galvao, Craig Jones, Lachlan Giles, Gordon Ryan, Tye Ruotulo, William Tackett, Nicky Ryan, and many other professional black belts are stepping up, and showcasing their extraordinary skills in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. Watching high-level black belts compete in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is an extremely amazing, and cultural experience, as usual, all the fans will stand still when two back belts are competing. Watching the high-level competition exposes grapplers all over the world to an exceptional technical proficiency that is showcased on the worldstage. The more experienced grappler will have their preparation down pat, as they know the benefits of balancing BJJ and weight training regimes. High-level grapplers are extremely well conditioned, that their training becomes more and more precise. 

IS IT SAFE FOR KIDS TO COMPETE IN BJJ

Kids as young as 4 and 5 years of age train in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, as it is a great way for them to learn how to be confident, and defend themselves. Kids are also highly encouraged to compete, as this can be another great way for them to develop their skills in confidence, and decision making, especially while they're under extreme amounts of pressure. Competing for children can be really fun, as stepping out onto the mats and representing their club, with a chance of winning Jiu Jitsu titles, can be very exciting for children. Even though sometimes it's daunting to watch your child compete in BJJ, it is definitely giving the child a considerable amount of skills in facing adversity. Sometimes kids competing in BJJ can cause them to be discouraged from the sport, especially when they are merged into higher divisions against more skillful, and stronger children. So there are a lot of factors that go into children competing in BJJ tournaments, but you can rest assured that kids are definitely safe these days due to the expertise of the black belt referees. All referees are there to make sure every child is safe, as they can stop the fight at any moment they see fit, this includes when a child is in a submission and they do not tap. The referee has the power to stop the fight, which is an extremely common reaction when a child is stuck in an armbar, or a choke.

Giancarlo Bodoni is one of the most exciting grapplers on the circuit today!  He's joined forces with BJJFanatics.com to share his latest closed guard series.  Check it out here at this link!

bjj competition training

HOW TO WIN A BJJ TOURNAMENT

Winning a BJJ tournament requires a blend of technical proficiency, strategic planning, and robust mental resilience. Focus on refining your technique and pay special attention to your guard game, which is often pivotal in determining the outcome of a match. Master the art of efficient energy use, balancing aggression with patience. Develop multiple game plans to adapt to different opponents. Don’t underestimate the value of mental preparation; visualize your success, maintain a positive mindset, and learn to handle competition stress effectively.

CONCLUSION

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is a Martial Art that is all about long jeverdy, as the sport encourages students of all age groups to take up this form of combat. Students that are fully entrenched in a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu academy, will see just how much fun it is to train, and compete in BJJ at tournaments state and nationwide. Whether you are a child, a Mother, an elderly person, or a seasoned athlete, competing in BJJ tournaments can be a lot of fun. It is also the best way to test your skills, and prove yourself within your academy and the community of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.

If you enjoyed this piece, consider checking:

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