The Kimura From closed Guard

The Kimura From closed Guard

The kimura is one of the most dominant submissions in bjj.  The kimura can be used as a submission or you can use it as a position.  The kimura grip is extremely versatile and can be used from several different places. One of the best places to use the kimura is from the closed guard.  This is one of the first submissions many people learn from closed guard but it is difficult to master.

The kimura from closed guard can be used to submit your opponent or you can use it to set up other attacks and from other attacks.  This grip is so powerful and when used properly, it can be one of the best grips for attacks.  Check out our article “Closed Guard Kimura Trap” to see a basic entry.

The Kimura as a Submission

The kimura is often perceived as a submission but people often forget that the grip is far more.  It can be used as a transitional position, or grip.  When using the Kimura as a submission from closed guard, it is one of the most powerful submissions you can apply. The kimura is easy to finish for the most part when you are in closed guard, the difficulty lies in finding the grip. Check out our article “Art of the Closed Guard” to learn more on setting up things.

There are several ways to get the kimura grip but many of them start with breaking your opponent’s posture and forcing them to post, preferably on the mat, or on your stomach.  Once they post you can grab the wrist and proceed to look for the kimura grip.  Another great way of getting the kimura is by using it from other positions such as the triangle position, omoplata, and other submissions.

When someone is getting attacked from submissions they are preoccupied defending that submission.  This opens up other attacks.  For example, if you have someone in a triangle, they will be preoccupied defending the triangle and this will allow you to attack the kimura.  Check out this video below where Neil Melanson shows a kimura from closed guard.

Using the Kimura to Transition

Using the kimura to transition in closed guard is always an excellent option.  You can use the grip to set up arm drags, triangles, omoplatas and arm bars.  Much like we discussed above, when you are threatening a submission people will address it and defend, this will allow you to capitalize on other things. 

Many times when you lock up a kimura grip, people will post on your knee and you can get a triangle.  Or they will try and straiten their arm at which point you can attack an omoplata or an arm bar. Check out this video below of a kimura, it is not from closed guard but the finishing details are amazing.

If you want to learn some good closed guard tips and some sneaky kimuras, check out Neil Melanson’s 4 DVD set “The Marshall Guard.”  Neil has long been known as one of the best closed guard people in the world.