BJJ, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Grappling, Guard Retention, Jiu Jitsu, Martial Arts, Position Escapes, Submission Grappling, Submission Wrestling, Turtle Escape, Turtle Position -

Turtle Escape To Closed Guard

turtle

Being stuck in the turtle position can be a very dangerous game. If you get stuck there, your opponent has many avenues of attack. Your opponent can work for crucifix. He can hit the truck. And if you’re competing in the gi, then he can hit some nasty collar chokes such as the clock choke. Unfortunately, not enough people spend time training to escape the turtle. As Jiu Jitsu competitors, we have to spend time training every position, even if you don’t believe that you’ll get there. It is a foolish thought. So, one of the easiest ways to escape the turtle is to get back to closed guard. Let’s check the easiest turtle escape that you can do.

Perhaps there was a scramble, and you ended up on your elbows and knees, commonly known as the turtle position. Your opponent  is controlling you from an angle off the back. He is probably looking to attack the back in some way. The first important step is to use your inside leg wisely. With your inside leg, kick your leg through and then step behind your opponent with it. Your inside leg will act as your first piece of base. With your outside arm, you will need to post on it which will act as another piece of your base.

Next, you will use your inside arm to block your opponent’s knee. If he has gi pants on, feel free to grab the pants by the knee. Either way, you need to have it blocked. Now you can raise your hip up, and slide your outside leg through. You will be sitting guard. Use your inside arm to grab the opponent’s tricep (similar to an arm drag) and pull him down into your closed guard. You’re out of danger, and you’ll be ready to use one of the many techniques from closed guard.

The turtle is quite the underrated position. I feel that it is neglected because it is a situational position. But just because it is situational, does not mean it is not worth getting the experience from it. Train the defenses and attacks from it, because it can become a favorable position. Guys like Baret Yoshida and Garry Tonon often play from there and have great success. If you want to research the ins and outs of the turtle position, then check out…

Attacking & Defending The Turtle by Travis Stevens. Click here!


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